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  • 1.1 - The CPU - Eduqas GCSE (2020 spec) | CSNewbs

    Exam Board: Eduqas / WJEC 1.1 The Central Processing Unit (CPU) Specification: 2020 + The is the most important component in any computer system. Central Processing Unit ( CPU ) ​ The purpose of the CPU is to by constantly repeating the . process data and instructions fetch - decode - execute cycle CPU Components The control unit directs the flow of data and information into the CPU. It also controls the other parts of the CPU . ALU stands for ‘ Arithmetic and Logic Unit ’. It performs simple calculations and logical operations . The registers are temporary storage spaces for data and instructions inside the CPU. ​ The registers are used during the FDE cycle . ​ Five essential registers are explained in 1.2 . Cache memory is used to temporarily store data that is frequently accessed . ​ Cache memory is split into different levels . Level 1 and level 2 (L1 & L2) are usually within the CPU and level 3 (L3) is just outside it. See 1.3 and 1.5 for more information about cache. You should know: The control unit is also known as the controller and cache memory is sometimes called internal memory . Computer Architecture The way a computer is and laid out is known as its . designed architecture ​ The most common type of computer architecture is . Von Neumann Von Neumann Architecture The is the most important component in as it is constantly and . CPU Von Neumann architecture fetching and decoding instructions from RAM controlling the other parts of the system ​ also stores both . Von Neumann architecture instructions and data in memory Being able to store programs in allows computers to be re-programmed for other tasks - this enables it to and run several applications at the same time. memory multitask ​ Data is another key feature of this architecture. input and output ​ An , which features the control unit as the most essential component. alternative architecture is Harvard uesto's uestions Q Q 1.1 - The Central Processing Unit (CPU): ​ What does ' ' ? [ 1a. CPU stand for 1 ] What is the ? [ 1b. purpose of the CPU 2 ] ​ , use the same symbols as shown on this page. [ 2a. Draw a diagram of the CPU 4 ] Label the of the CPU. [ 2b. four main components 4 ] ​ Describe the of: 3. purpose The [ a. Control Unit 2 ] The [ b. ALU 2 ] The [ c. registers 2 ] [ d. Cache memory 2 ] ​ Describe the . [ 4a. key features of Von Neumann architecture 3 ] Explain why is important. [ 4b. storing data in memory 1 ] State an . [ 4c . alternative architecture 1 ] Theory Topics 1.2 - The FDE Cycle

  • 1.1 - The CPU - Eduqas GCSE (2016 Spec) | CSNewbs

    Exam Board: Eduqas / WJEC 1.1 The Central Processing Unit (CPU) Specification: 2016 + The is the most important component in any computer system. Central Processing Unit ( CPU ) ​ The purpose of the CPU is to by constantly repeating the . process data and instructions fetch - decode - execute cycle CPU Components The control unit directs the flow of data and information into the CPU. It also controls the other parts of the CPU . ALU stands for ‘ Arithmetic and Logic Unit ’. It performs simple calculations and logical operations . The registers are temporary storage spaces for data and instructions inside the CPU. ​ The registers are used during the FDE cycle . ​ Five essential registers are explained in 1.2 . Cache memory is used to temporarily store data that is frequently accessed . ​ Cache memory is split into different levels . Level 1 and level 2 (L1 & L2) are usually within the CPU and level 3 (L3) is just outside it. See 1.3 and 1.5 for more information about cache. You should know: The control unit is also known as the controller and cache memory is sometimes called internal memory . Computer Architecture The way a computer is and laid out is known as its . designed architecture ​ The most common type of computer architecture is . Von Neumann Von Neumann Architecture The is the most important component in as it is constantly and . CPU Von Neumann architecture fetching and decoding instructions from RAM controlling the other parts of the system ​ also stores both . Von Neumann architecture instructions and data in memory Being able to store programs in allows computers to be re-programmed for other tasks - this enables it to and run several applications at the same time. memory multitask ​ Data is another key feature of this architecture. input and output ​ An , which features the control unit as the most essential component. alternative architecture is Harvard uesto's uestions Q Q 1.1 - The Central Processing Unit (CPU): ​ What does ' ' ? [ 1a. CPU stand for 1 ] What is the ? [ 1b. purpose of the CPU 2 ] ​ , use the same symbols as shown on this page. [ 2a. Draw a diagram of the CPU 4 ] Label the of the CPU. [ 2b. four main components 4 ] ​ Describe the of: 3. purpose The [ a. Control Unit 2 ] The [ b. ALU 2 ] The [ c. registers 2 ] [ d. Cache memory 2 ] ​ Describe the . [ 4a. key features of Von Neumann architecture 3 ] Explain why is important. [ 4b. storing data in memory 1 ] State an . [ 4c . alternative architecture 1 ] 1.2 - The FDE Cycle Theory Topics

  • 1.2 - The FDE Cycle - Eduqas GCSE (2020 spec) | CSNewbs

    1.2: The FDE Cycle Exam Board: Eduqas / WJEC Specification: 2020 + The is performed by the millions of times every second. Fetch - Decode - Execute (FDE) cycle CPU ​ This cycle is how the for each program or service that requires its attention. CPU processes data and instructions Important Registers A is a for in the . register small storage space temporary data CPU ​ Each register has a . There are five essential registers used in the specific role FDE cycle : Program Counter (PC) A register that tracks the RAM address of the next instruction to be fetched . Memory Address Register (MAR) ​ A register that tracks the RAM address of the instruction that is to be fetched . Memory Data Register (MDR) ​ The MDR stores the that has been to the . instruction transferred from RAM CPU Current Instruction Register (CIR) A register that stores the instruction that has been fetched from RAM , and is about to be decoded or executed . Accumulator (ACC) ​ The ACC stores the of . result mathematical or logical calculations Fetch - Decode - Execute Cycle The essential idea of the FDE cycle is that , to be (understood) and . instructions are fetched from RAM decoded executed (processed) by the CPU 1. The ( ) register displays the of the . Program Counter PC address in RAM next instruction to be processed This value is the ( ). copied into Memory Address Register MAR 0054 2. The register is . PC increased by 1 ​ This for the to be fetched. prepares the CPU next instruction 0055 3. The CPU which held . checks the address in RAM matches the address in the MAR 0054 4. The is ( ). instruction in RAM transferred to the Memory Data Register MDR 5. The is ( ). instruction in the MDR copied into the Current Instruction Register CIR MDR MDR CIR 6. The is (understood) and (processed). instruction in the CIR decoded executed Any is ( ) register. result of an execution stored in the Accumulator ACC CIR ACC 7. The by returning to the and checking the program counter for the address of the . cycle repeats first step next instruction uesto's uestions Q Q 1.2 - The Fetch - Decode - Execute (FDE) Cycle: ​ . What is the ? [ 1 purpose of the registers 1 ] ​ . Describe : 2 the purpose of each register The [ a. Program Counter (PC) 1 ] The b. Memory Address Register (MAR) [ 1 ] The [ c. Memory Data Register (MDR) 1 ] The d. Current Instruction Register (CIR) [ 1 ] The [ e. Accumulator (ACC) 1 ] ​ Draw a diagram of the . [ 3. seven steps of the Fetch - Decode - Execute cycle 7 ] 1.1 - The CPU 1.3 - Primary Storage Theory Topics

  • 1.2 - The FDE Cycle - Eduqas GCSE (2016 Spec) | CSNewbs

    1.2: The FDE Cycle Exam Board: Eduqas / WJEC Specification: 2016 + The is performed by the millions of times every second. Fetch - Decode - Execute (FDE) cycle CPU ​ This cycle is how the for each program or service that requires its attention. CPU processes data and instructions Important Registers A is a for in the . register small storage space temporary data CPU ​ Each register has a . There are three essential registers used in the specific role FDE cycle : Program Counter (PC) A register that tracks the RAM address of the next instruction to be fetched . Memory Address Register (MAR) A register that tracks the RAM address of the instruction that is to be fetched . Current Instruction Register (CIR) A register that stores the instruction that has been fetched from RAM , and is about to be decoded or executed . Fetch - Decode - Execute Cycle The essential idea of the FDE cycle is that , to be (understood) and . instructions are fetched from RAM decoded executed (processed) by the CPU 1. The ( ) register displays the of the . Program Counter PC address in RAM next instruction to be processed This value is the ( ). copied into Memory Address Register MAR 0054 2. The register is . PC increased by 1 ​ This for the to be fetched. prepares the CPU next instruction 0055 3. The CPU which held . checks the address in RAM matches the address in the MAR 0054 4. The is ( ). instruction in RAM transferred to the Current Instruction Register CIR CIR 5. The is (understood) and (processed) by the most - such as the for a calculation. instruction in the CIR decoded executed appropriate component ALU 6. The by returning to the and checking the program counter for the address of the . cycle repeats first step next instruction uesto's uestions Q Q 1.2 - The Fetch - Decode - Execute (FDE) Cycle: ​ . What is the ? [ 1 purpose of the registers 2 ] ​ . Describe : 2 the purpose of each register The [ a. Program Counter (PC) 1 ] The b. Memory Address Register (MAR) [ 1 ] The c. Current Instruction Register (CIR) [ 1 ] ​ Draw a diagram of the . [ 3. six steps of the Fetch - Decode - Execute cycle 6 ] These are not the only registers but the main three used as part of the FDE cycle. Other registers exist, such as the accumulator , which stores the result of calculations made by the ALU . 1.1 - The CPU Theory Topics 1.3 - Primary Storage

  • Computer Science Newbies

    C omputer S cience Newb ie s CSNewbs is aimed at GCSE Computer Science and OCR Cambridge Technicals IT students . ​ The site is viewed in the UK and internationally by thousands of users each week . ​ Click here for frequently asked questions and information about CSNewbs . ​ TEACHER RESOURCES ! Take a free sneak peek at the Eduqas GCSE resources coming soon ! Quick links to popular topics on CSNewbs: What's New on CSNewbs? Python OCR Cambridge Technicals Level 3 IT You are viewing the mobile version of CSNewbs. The site may appear better on a desktop or laptop . WJEC / Eduqas GCSE Topics Greenfoot Brand new Greenfoot topic section ​ Updated Greenfoot Glossary of key code ​ New Greenfoot tutorials on YouTube ​ New HTML tutorials on YouTube ​ Improved 6.6 Logical Protection (OCR Unit 2) ​ Improved 4.1 UK Legislation (OCR Unit 2) CSNewbs last updated: Friday, 22nd January 2021 You are viewing the desktop version of CSNewbs. Have you tried it on mobile ? Keep updated on social media: Have a vacancy in your York / Leeds-based school for September 2021? ​ Hire Me!

  • CSN+ Preview | CSNewbs

    About CSNewbs Plus (CSN+) CSN+ is a premium collection of resources made for teachers that follows the Computer Science specifications covered on the website . ​ Currently, these resources are in development , with the Eduqas GCSE resource pack arriving first, based on the Eduqas GCSE Computer Science 2020 specification . < Free zip folder download of all resources for Eduqas GCSE topic 1.1 (The CPU) *Updated Jan 2021* ​ Resources included for each topic: Lesson Slides Starter activity (to print) Task resources (e.g. diagrams or worksheets to print) Task answers What is included in the CSNewbs+ GCSE collection? 39 presentation slides 39 starters 39 task answer documents 19 revision activity pages 7 topic tests & answers ​ ​ See below for more details: + Complete presentation slides for each of the 39 theory topics in the Eduqas GCSE 2020 specification . ​ PowerPoint and Google Slides compatible. Activity resources to print . Including diagrams , tables and worksheets for lesson tasks . All answers included for teachers to use. Starter questions that recap the previous topic. For teachers to print before the lesson. All answers included in the lesson slides. 39 starters . Comprehensive answers for all lesson tasks . 39 task answer documents containing answers for over 100 lesson tasks for teachers to use . Revision templates for students to complete, to print on A3 paper . 19 pages and 7 revision lesson slides . Exercise book headings and the driving question (lesson focus) 7 end-of-topic tests with brand new questions . All answers included for teachers. What is included on the presentation slides? The following breakdown shows the presentation slides for 1.1 (The CPU): A title slide The content covered from the Eduqas GCSE specification Exercise book headings and the driving question (lesson focus) Answers to the starter activity questions Lesson objectives An explanation of the topic Clear explanations of the content First task. Students use slides or CSNewbs to complete. All answers on separate teacher document. Task 2. Table provided in teacher resource pack to print. Further explanations of the content Further explanations of the content with diagrams. Further explanations of the content with diagrams. Task 3. Answers in the teacher document. Plenary to check the students' understanding of the lesson topics. < Free zip folder download of all resources for Eduqas GCSE topic 1.1 (The CPU) *Updated Jan 2021*

  • 1.3 - Primary Storage - Eduqas GCSE (2016 Spec) | CSNewbs

    1.3: Primary Storage (Memory) Exam Board: Eduqas / WJEC Specification: 2016 + Storage in a computer system is split into two categories. Primary Storage: Very quick to access because it is attached to the motherboard . Typically smaller in storage size . Sometimes called ‘main memory’ . Secondary Storage: Slower to access because it is not directly embedded on the motherboard . Typically larger in storage size . Sometimes called ‘backing storage’ . ​ Storage is also split into two types - and . volatile non-volatile is - whenever the .​ Volatile storage temporary data is lost power is turned off Example: RAM Non-volatile storage the data even . Data can be and accessed when the computer is switched on saves when not being powered stored long-term . Example: ROM Types of Primary Storage (Memory) Random Access Memory (RAM) is (temporary) storage that . RAM also stores parts of the to be accessed by the CPU. RAM volatile stores all programs that are currently running operating system ​ RAM is made up of a large number of storage locations, each can be identified by a . unique address Read-Only Memory (ROM) is storage that . ROM non-volatile cannot be changed ​ ROM stores the for when the computer is switched on. The BIOS then loads up the to take over managing the computer. boot program / BIOS operating system RAM ( R andom A ccess M emory) ROM ( R ead O nly M emory) Cache Memory Cache memory is (temporary) storage that volatile . stores data that is frequently accessed It is because it is than other types of memory like RAM. very quick to access closer to the CPU ​ The are explained in more detail in . three levels of cache memory 1.5 Flash Memory Flash memory is editable so it can be read and written to . It is also non-volatile so it can be used for long-term data storage even when the system is not powered on. Flash memory is also used for secondary storage devices like USB sticks and solid-state drives - see 1.4 . Cache Memory uesto's uestions Q Q 1.3 - Primary Storage (Memory): ​ Describe the . This could be done in a with the column headings . [ 1. differences between primary and secondary storage table 'access speed' , 'storage size' and 'also known as' 6 ] ​ Explain the . State an of both types. 2. difference between volatile and non-volatile storage example [ 4 ] ​ 3. For each type of memory below, describe it and state what information is stored within it: [ ] a . Random Access Memory (RAM) 3 [ b. Read-Only Memory (ROM) 3 ] [ c. Cache memory 3 ] [ d. Flash memory 3 ] 1.2 - FDE Cycle Theory Topics 1.4 - Secondary Storage

  • 4.2 - Global Legislation | Unit 2 | OCR Cambridge Technicals | CSNewbs

    4.2 - Global Legislation Exam Board: OCR Specification: 2016 - Unit 2 Data Protection Outside of the UK should unless the country receiving the data has that match the / ( ). Personal data not be transferred outside of the UK adequate data protection laws Data Protection Act (2018) GDPR General Data Protection Regulation ​ was introduced in all ( ) in 2018. This set of regulations and can be sent between EU countries. However, many other countries (such as the USA and Canada) whilst regarding data protection. GDPR European Union EU countries ensure that personal data is protected only have partially adequate data protection laws many nations have inadequate or no laws Click the map button to visit CNIL's website and see exactly which countries have adequate, inadequate and no data protection laws. UNCRPD stands for . UNCRPD United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities This is a United Nations human right that states (article 9) and (article 21). disabled people should be able to 'access information systems' 'use digital means to express their opinion' Methods of complying with this convention include:​ Personal data can be (such as the UK) because of a which was known as the ' ' scheme (between 2000 and 2015) and the ' ' (between 2015 and 2020). sent between European countries and the United States protection scheme Safe Harbour EU-US Privacy Shield ​ This provided and required engaged in data transaction to before personal data could be transferred. The companies must have been for the security of the data. protection to European data in the US both companies sign up to the scheme assessed as responsible ​ The scheme was because the European Court of Justice argued it did not adequately protect the personal data of Europeans from government access. stopped in July 2020 Using so that text-to-speech software can describe the image aloud, for the . The tag can be added to the HTML code of an image on a website and will be by specialist reading software. < alt> text on images visually impaired audibly spoken This image contains alt text that can't be seen by a typical viewer but will be read aloud by screen reading software. . Websites could allow users to and style or change the background colour to make . Wikipedia presents some articles to be if the user is unable to read them. Accessibility settings change the font size text easier to read listened to Example Text Example Text Example Text Example Text uesto's uestions Q Q 4.2 - Global Legislation: ​ What is the ? [ ] 1a. problem with transferring data outside of the UK 2 Why can personal data be ? [ ] 1b. transferred between European countries 2 ​ Open the (use the and click on a specific country to see its name) and state: 2. CNIL map link on this page Four countries in the EU Two countries with partially adequate protection Two countries with an authority and law (dark purple) Two countries with laws only (light purple) Four countries with no data protection laws [ ] 7 ​ What is and why is it ? [ ] 3a. UNCRPD important 3 Describe what is used for. [ ] 3b. alt text 2 State that could affect how . [ ] 3c. three accessibility settings easy text is to read 3 EU-US Privacy Shield 4.1 - UK Legislation Topic List 4.3 - Green IT

  • 4.1 - UK Legislation | Unit 2 | OCR Cambridge Technicals | CSNewbs

    4.1 - UK Legislation Specification: 2016 - Unit 2 Exam Board: OCR There are many types of legislation - laws that have been written into use - that concern data storage, protection and the use of information. In an exam, . the year the law was introduced must be stated In 2018 the European Union introduced ( ) to of data for people in the EU. The UK matched this by updating the Data Protection Act introduced in 1998 to become the . GDPR General Data Protection Regulation protect the privacy Data Protection Act (2018) ​ This act that is stored on computers and processed by organisations. protects the data of individuals ​ How the Data Protection Act works: ​ Each person who has their data stored is known as a . An employee within an organisation must be appointed as a and it is they who are responsible for . data subject data controller registering with the Information Commissioner The Information Commissioner is the person in the UK who is responsible for , most significantly the Data Protection Act. managing several laws When registering with the Information Commissioner, the organisation's on exactly: data controller must be clear they are collecting, What information it is being collected, Why What the data will be . used for ​ The six principles of the Data Protection Act (2018) state: 1. Data must be collected lawfully and processed fairly. 2. Collected data must only be used for the reasons specified. 3. Data must be relevant and not excessive. 4. Data must be accurate and up-to-date. 5. Data must not be stored for longer than necessary, 6. Data must be stored and processed securely. Actions organisations must take to stick to the Data Protection Act (2018): ​ The company must to act as the organisation's . The data controller is and . appoint and register a member of staff data controller responsible for communicating with the Information Commissioner ensuring the principles of the DPA are not broken There must be in practice to or transferred . This could be in the form of enforced by the company. strong security measures protect data from being accessed without authorisation physical or digital protection methods so that they are and each principle is adhered to. For example, they should know that when it is collected and should of the data subject. Staff should be trained clearly aware of their responsibilities data can only be used for the reasons specified not be passed to others with the permission should be given the and . Data should be , so organisations should of storing each data subject's information. Data subjects opportunity to alter their data make changes if it is incorrect deleted when it is no longer needed periodically assess both the accuracy and relevance to make a ( ) and which is stored about them. by and . ​ Data subjects have the right Subject Access Request SAR receive a copy of the data Companies must abide by this request verifying the user's identify presenting the data to them securely Rights of data subjects: ​ Under the Data Protection Act, individuals have a to any by . right of access information that is stored about them public bodies ​ If an they must submit a ( ) which results in the following steps: individual wishes to access their data Subject Access Request SAR ​ The organisation's must be written to and told to access. data controller exactly what information is required An should be paid to the organisation ( ). administrative fee but only if the request requires excessive efforts to fulfil The organisation must provide the requested information . within 40 days The individual must using appropriate ID because . verify their identity only the data subject can request their data Computer Misuse Act (1990) This act was introduced as . The act attempts to stop and . Breaking any of the three principles could result in but only if it can be proved it was done and not by accident. computers became cheaper and more common at home and work punish those who use computers inappropriately fines and a jail sentence on purpose ​ The ( ) includes :​ Computer Misuse Act 1990 three main principles 1. No unauthorised access to data. ​ Example: Hacking a computer system. 2. No unauthorised access to data that could be used for further illegal activities. ​ Example: Accessing personal data to use as blackmail or identity theft. 3. No unauthorised modification of data. ​ ​ Example: Spreading a virus to change data. Data Protection Act (2018) / GDPR Freedom of Information Act (2000) Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (2000) Copyright, Designs & Patents Act (1988) This act makes it a of the creator or the copyright holder. This can refer to text, images, music, videos or software. criminal offence to copy work that is not your own without the permission Owning the copyright of an image might not prevent others from copying and using it but this act means that the owner can . bring legal proceedings in court to those who have stolen their work ​ Creators of copyrighted work can . Others to use the work otherwise the copyright holder can or . take ownership of their work and control how it is used must ask for permission ask for it to be removed demand a fee for its use ​ This act specifically prohibits the following actions: to . Making copies of copyrighted material sell to others (except for personal use). Importing and downloading illegally copied material to have a . Distributing enough copyrighted material noticeable effect on the copyright holder , as part of a business. Possessing equipment used to copy copyrighted material Protection of Freedoms Act (2012) There are seven sections to this act, revolving around the . It was introduced because there was , and to . IT-related sections are summarised below: protection of personal data little legislation about biometric data update older laws ​ Part 1 - States how (e.g. fingerprints and DNA) is stored, handled and collected. For example, before their child gives biometric data to a school. Also, biometric data for suspects of minor offences is after the case is closed. biometric data parents must give consent deleted ​ Part 2 - Creates (automatic number plate recognition) use. new regulation for CCTV and ANPR ​ Part 5 - The was created to run on anyone wanting to work with children or vulnerable people. Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) background checks ​ Part 6 - Extends the allowing for . Freedom of Information Act (2000) wider requests to be made This act allows people to . Public authorities include , , and . request public authorities to release information local councils government departments universities hospitals ​ A freedom of information must be and a from the organisation is required of receiving the request. request formally submitted in a letter or email reply within twenty days ​ A simple freedom of information request might be the in the past year. , such as if processing the request would be or if it involves protected by the ( ). average response times of the local ambulance service Certain requests will not be accepted too expensive sensitive information Data Protection Act 2018 Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) Codes of Practice The is the senior government official in charge of the country's and the . The Information Commissioner's Office describes itself as "The UK’s independent authority set up to uphold information rights in the public interest, promoting openness by public bodies and data privacy for individuals". The ICO publishes about various , usually related to . For example, the ICO has a code of practice regarding and another code of practice about . The ICO to both (such as giving access to students to their exam results) and (such as support with legal electronic marketing). information commissioner freedom of information requests protection of personal data codes of practices data protection and privacy topics explaining the Data Protection Act how organisations should share data the use of CCTV offers help and support individuals organisations This act (often shortened to RIPA ) was introduced in response to the increase in both criminal and terrorist activities on the internet, it is used to monitor and access online communication of suspected criminals . If criminal activity is suspected by an individual then this act grants the following powers : ​ Internet Service Providers (ISPs) must provide access to the suspect's online communication , such as emails or social media. Locked or encrypted data may be accessed such as online messages. ISPs could install surveillance equipment or software to track the suspect's online activity . Surveillance may take place to physically track the suspect , e.g. in private vans or by undercover officers in public spaces. Access must be granted to personal information . ​ This act became controversial as its use widened and local councils were using it for minor offences - a Scottish council used the act to monitor dog barking and a council in Cumbria gathered video evidence about who was feeding pigeons . The act has since been changed to only allow the surveillance of crime suspects . Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (2003) This law (which was ) . updated in 2011 regulates how organisations can communicate with individuals Companies must stick to the following rules: ​ It is an unless they have to receive communication. This is commonly managed by using on online stores where you must to receiving promotional material. offence to directly contact an individual specifically opted-in tick boxes opt-in Companies must when contacting customers, such as - and the number. clearly state who they are displaying the phone number when calling not 'hiding' Organisations must . explain how cookies are used on their website Companies must that the . This can be done with when signing up. Customers can select or de-select methods such as , and . only contact customers through communication channels customer has previously permitted tick boxes email phone calls text messages ​ The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) is responsible for this regulation and can fine companies that commit up to £500,000. It is the who benefits and is protected by this regulation. unsolicited communication customer Equality Act (2010) The government states that "The Equality Act in the and in wider society." legally protects people from discrimination workplace ​ Discrimination because of such as are specifically punishable by legal action. protected characteristics gender , race , religion , age and disability The aim of the act is to and open up for every employee regardless of that are . end discrimination in the workplace fair opportunities behavioural or physical characteristics outside of their control ​ Within a company, the Equality Act by stating or change of role. Information . protects staff protected characteristics should not be a factor in an employee's promotion must be presented in a format accessible to all staff EQUALITY ! ! ! uesto's uestions Q Q 4.1 - UK Legislation: ​ Create a flashcard or PowerPoint slide for above. Explain the , its and . [ ] 1. each legislation purpose of the legislation main principles whom it affects 5 each 3.6 - Information Systems Topic List 4.2 - Global Legislation

  • About | CSNewbs

    about Frequently Asked Questions Computer Science Newbies Who made CSNewbs? My name is Mr Pulsford . I am a Computer Science teacher from London and I currently teach at a secondary school in Birmingham , England . ​ When and why did you make this? I wanted to make a resource that my . I was working on a paid summer project at in London in students could access outside of the classroom G o o g l e 2016 when I was inspired to start the site. I've been updating it ever since as much as I can, outside of lessons and life. I made CSNewbs to support students in lessons and at home because Computer Science can be a tricky subject and many websites are too technical or peripheral . ​ Why does it say 'Hire Me' on the homepage? In the summer of 2021 . If you work at a school with an upcoming vacancy for in a and you want a with and then please send me an using the address at this page's end for my CV and more details. I am permanently moving to the York / Leeds area September 2021 Teacher of Computer Science role dedicated, hard-working staff member excellent subject knowledge years of experience and great results email Which courses does CSNewbs cover? The ' GCSE ' section follows the Eduqas specification ( both 2016 and 2020 ). The ' CTech ' section follows the OCR Cambridge Technicals Level 3 IT 2016 specification for Unit 1 (Fundamentals of IT) and Unit 2 (Global Information). The ' Programming ' section contains material for Python , HTML , Greenfoot and others. The ' KS3 ' section covers basic Computer Science topics aimed at Year 7 - 9 students . ​ Do the exam boards pay you money for this? CSNewbs is , . The content on this site has been by closely following the publicly released specifications by Eduqas and OCR. not affiliated with any exam board financially or otherwise independently created ​ Can I get a level 9 / distinction just from CSNewbs? The content on this website is of and should be used to of the course's content. Like all resources , it should be and . CSNewbs makes no miraculous claims linking content use and final exam results.​ high-quality guide students towards a better understanding however supported with a range of appropriate material sound classroom teaching How did you make this website? CSNewbs.com was created and is maintained using . Wix ​ What's the deal with copyright? CSNewbs is , and copy / paste features have been disabled on the site. All images have either been or used from . Embedded videos are linked to content from the page. If you think any content on this site , please email me, and I will make . protected by copyright created by myself Wix's copyright-free vector gallery / their stock image library CSNewbs YouTube infringes a copyright-protected work immediate changes ​ I don't see any adverts, how are you making money? You're right, there are and I intend to keep it that way. including but the . no adverts CSNewbs teacher resources are currently in development lesson slides , worksheets and revision activity sheets content on the site will always stay free and available ​ Can you add Unit 3 / OCR A-Level / something else? The site continues to . The eventual aim is to cover every exam board for GCSE Computer Science but that will take a lot of time! expand over time with new content Who is the robot? The robot is called Questo . It's the site mascot and it appears on most pages to ask you questions about the content (' Questo's Questions '). It used to have a body but since 2020 it's just a head. ​ I can't believe one person made this whole site while teaching and the rest, what are your long-term plans? If you work for an exam board or educational resource organisation , and your organisation has opportunities available , please send me an email. How can I contact the creator of CSNewbs? The contact email is: You can stay updated on CSNewbs additions and improvements by following our social media pages : Privacy Policy

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